Wednesday, October 1, 2014

Corcoran SHU prisoners start hunger strike for decent healthcare; support needed now

Sept. 28th, 2014
From: SFBayview

On Friday, Sept. 26, 2014, three men locked inside unit 4B-1L of the Secure Housing Unit (SHU) of California State Prison-Corcoran started a hunger strike:
Heshima Denham (J-38283), followed on Sept. 27 by Michael Zaharibu Dorrough (D-83611), and Kambui Robinson (C-82830) will join them the following day for a few days or as long as he can considering his poor health.


Why?
The medical care at Corcoran SHU is so bad that life-threatening situations have occurred on too many occasions to the people in the SHU and possibly also elsewhere at CSP-Corcoran that they have had to resort to a hunger strike, the ultimate nonviolent protest, in order to make this point known to the warden, the medical receiver appointed by the court to oversee California’s notoriously bad prison healthcare, and the administration of the California Department of Corrections (CDCr).

Several factors made the three decide to protest the lack of healthcare now: Kambui has diabetes that is very badly regulated with a HBA1C of 9.3 – far too high for diabetics, especially with those already suffering loss of eyesight and neuropathy – and Zaharibu has dangerous, untreated, extremely high cholesterol, making him very vulnerable to stroke, and he has untreated gall stones and a CPAP machine [for sleep apnea, can cause strokes] without an extension cord to work effectively.

Custody staff interfering with medical staff is causing dangerous situations.


What can you do to help?

Ideally we want Michael (Zaharibu) Dorrough and Kambui Robinson moved to Vacaville or New Folsom medical facilities. Kambui’s situation is most critical:

He needs more control over his insulin-dependent diabetes – better regulation, prevention of more complications, and a special diet for diabetics, with sufficient carbohydrates, low fat, whole grains, access to glucose and daily exercise outside his cell. He also needs a diagnostic scan to determine nerve damage in his brain.

For Michael Dorrough (D-83611): normal access to the CPAP machine, treatment for high cholesterol levels and treatment for gallstones.

[Note: Both Michael Dorrough and Kambui Robinson also need to be moved away from the Central Valley due to Valley Fever!]

Finally, for Heshima Denham (J-38283), we need an MRI-scan to make a diagnosis of the pain in his right side and treatment for whatever is causing it. Heshima was recently also diagnosed with PTSD.
Please keep in mind these are medical issues that should be treated with discretion.

Although I concentrate on these three people who are on a hunger strike, they have expressed that they are striking for all people with a disease or injury needing better care, chronic or not, at CSP-Corcoran.

Although I concentrate on these three people who are on a hunger strike, they have expressed that they are striking for all people with a disease or injury needing better care, chronic or not, at CSP-Corcoran.


Call or write to the Corcoran warden, or leave a message with his secretary. Below is a proposed script:

Call or email Warden Dave Davey, at 559 992-8800 or dave.davey@cdcr.ca.gov, or write to him at P.O. Box 8800, Corcoran, CA 93212-8309.

[Please cc emails to: Dr Clarence Cryer, clarence.cryer@cdcr.ca.gov , Chief Executive Officer in charge of health care at CSP-Corcoran.]

Call or send a copy of your letter or email to Diana Toche, Undersecretary for Health Care Services and Undersecretary for Administration and Offender Services, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation, Division of Correctional Health Care Services, P.O. Box 942883, Sacramento, CA 94283-0001, 916-691-0209, Diana.toche@cdcr.ca.gov.

Also send a copy to the Medical Receiver, California Correctional Health Care Services, Controlled Correspondence Unit, P.O. Box 588500, Elk Grove, CA 95758, CPHCSCCUWeb@cdcr.ca.gov.

Finally, contact the Ombudsman, at Cherita.Wofford@cdcr.ca.gov.


Suggested script for your phone call, email or letter


I am contacting you concerning the lack of specialized healthcare for people inside the CSP-Corcoran SHU, especially those with chronic diseases. I would like to make you aware of the fact that there is a hunger strike going on inside to demand that people with diabetes or sleep apnea and in need of special diets and other mental and physical healthcare get treated as they would when not incarcerated. Insulin-dependent diabetics with complications and patients with CPAP machines, mental illness such as PTSD and other mental challenges should not be in the SHU but in a medical facility.

The healthcare system in several California prisons is failing badly and we demand prompt action now:

Either move the diabetic patients and the CPAP-machine patients, as well as all other chronic disease patients, to a medical facility or improve the healthcare system, including the rules for, for instance, MRI scans in CSP-Corcoran.

MRI scans are only allowed when there is a physically visible wound. This is wrong!
Also, prevent custody staff from interfering with medical issues, please!

I respectfully insist you act this week to start making specific and general improvements to the healthcare in CSP-Corcoran SHU, before lives are lost.


Thank you.

Thursday, August 28, 2014

Oppose SB892! Oppose the making of Torture a part of California Law!

Update:
"This afternoon, Senator Loni Hancock decided to pull her bill, SB 892, because of growing opposition among key assembly members so that she no longer believed she had the votes necessary to pass the bill out of the Assembly." (from email by the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law).
----------
On behalf of California Families Against Solitary Confinement (CFASC), the Center for Human Rights and Constitutional Law, and others who joined an emergency conf call yesterday evening to address the imminent vote by the California Assembly and Senate on SB 892 (Senator Hancock) dealing with the critical issue of solitary confinement, we want to inform you of the following and urge you to widely distribute this message to your email lists.

 Issue: Between now and Sunday night the CA Assembly and Senate will vote on SB 892 drafted by Senator Hancock who got involved as a result of the prisoners' hunger strike in the summer of 2013 to denounce the conditions in solitary confinement and CA's unique "gang validation" policy. 

California's Department of Corrections (CDCR) has what is probably the WORST, MOST COSTLY, AND MOST INHUMANE solitary confinement policy of any state in the country. As a result of CDCR policies, California has the largest population of prisoners in long-term solitary confinement in the U.S. and more than any other country on earth! 

A prisoner in CDCR's custody commits suicide every ten days. Instead of reforming this policy--which includes placing prisoners who have engaged in no rule violations in long-term solitary for mere alleged gang membership ("gang validation policy")--SB 892 for the first time in history adopts this draconian policy into state law. 

The Opposition: The four prisoner reps at Pelican Bay who initiated the 2011 and 2013 hunger strikes have jointly opposed SB 892.  Hit this link to download their letter to thelegislature. About 130 organizations and community leaders have written to the Senate and Assembly leaders explaining why they oppose SB 892. Hit this link to download their letter. 

Among many others, organizations opposing SB 892 include CFASC (family members of prisoners), Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity Coalition, League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC), Mexican American Political Association (MAPA), Council on American-Islamic Relations - California (CAIR), Disability Rights Education & Defense Fund (DREDF), Homeboy Industries, Homies Unidos, California Prison Watch, Asian Law Caucus, National Lawyers Guild (SF and LA Chapters), the William C. Velasquez Institute (WCVI), Families to Amend California's Three Strikes and Hermandad Mexicana Humanitarian Foundation. 

 Five urgent action requests:

 * Join an emergency conference call Thursday at 8:30 pm.  Call in: (424) 203-8400 Code: 1038088#

* Please immediately forward this email to your constituents.

* We urge organizations and community, faith-based and labor leaders to telephone the following legislators Thursday and Friday to express strong opposition to SB 892: 
(1) Assembly Member Jimmy Gomez, Majority Whip, or his Chief of Staff John Scribner (916) 319-2051
(2) Assembly Member V. Manuel Pérez, Majority Floor Leader or his Chief of Staff Greg Campbell (916) 319-2053; and 
(3) Senator Darrell Steinberg, President pro Tempore, or his Chief of Staff Kathry Dresslar (916) 651-4006 or Legal Counsel Margie Estrada (916) 651-4170.

Thank you for respecting human rights and speaking out against torture.

Saturday, July 26, 2014

Dan Walters: California’s death penalty dying of old age

Posting this for archiving purposes.

Reblogged from: Sacramento Bee:

Dan Walters: California’s death penalty dying of old age
By Dan Walters
Published: Tuesday, Jul. 22, 2014

During the last four decades, no California political issue has burned more intensely than capital punishment, but it may have ended with a whimper, rather than with a bang, last week.

Federal Judge Cormac Carney ruled that the death penalty is unconstitutional because it’s rarely used – thanks largely to ceaseless legal challenges from its opponents, one should note.

Another irony is that Jerry Brown – a lifelong foe of capital punishment – was governor when it dominated the Capitol in the 1970s, and he’s governor again as Carney’s ruling more than likely ends it.

Read more here: http://www.sacbee.com/2014/07/22/6574992/dan-walters-californias-death.html#storylink=cpy

Tuesday, July 8, 2014

Largest hunger strike in history: California prisoners speak out on first anniversary

This is from the SF BayView, July 7th 2014.
[Note by CAPW: Not only do we commemorate the first anniversary of the largest hunger strike, but also the third anniversary of the first hungerstrike in 2011, that commenced on July 1st 2011]

One year ago, on July 8, 2013, 30,000 California prisoners initiated the largest hunger strike the world has ever seen. Sixty days later, 40 prisoners, who had eaten nothing in all that time, agreed to suspend the strike when state legislators promised to hold hearings on ending solitary confinement, the heart of their demands.
Hundreds braved blistering heat to rally outside Corcoran State Prison, where hundreds were on hunger strike, on July 13, 2013. Spirits were lifted as the supporters shouted loud enough to be heard inside. The 2013 strike made headlines around the world, and support rallies were held as far away as Philadelphia, Mexico City and Berlin. – Photo: Malaika Kambon
Hundreds braved blistering heat to rally outside Corcoran State Prison, where hundreds were on hunger strike, on July 13, 2013. Spirits were lifted as the supporters shouted loud enough to be heard inside. The 2013 strike made headlines around the world, and support rallies were held as far away as Philadelphia, Mexico City and Berlin. – Photo: Malaika Kambon

The 2013 hunger strike followed two in 2011 in which participation peaked at 6,600 and 12,000. In the interim, effective October 2012, the hunger strike leaders, representing all racial groups, issued the historic Agreement to End Hostilities, which has held with few exceptions throughout the California prison system ever since.

These statements, most by hunger strike participants, arrived in time for the July 8 anniversary, and more will be added as they arrive.

We the people

by Mutope Duguma (James Crawford)
What we learned this far in our protracted struggle is that We the People are the vanguard. We the People have to demand what we want for ourselves. No government, no power, no authority and no one should be able to trample over the People without the People rising up and saying, “Under no circumstances do We the People accept this in our home.”
We the People reject torture of human beings,
We the People reject mass incarceration of our sons and daughters,
We the People reject police brutality,
We the People reject poverty,
We the People reject solitary confinement,
We the People reject Security Threat Groups and Step Down Programs,
We the People reject oppressive prison conditions
In solidarity.

We the People reject violence

Incarcerated artists rose to the occasion, encouraging participation inside and support outside. – Art: Michael D. Russell, C-90473, PBSP SHU, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City, CA 95532
Incarcerated artists rose to the occasion, encouraging participation inside and support outside. – Art: Michael D. Russell, C-90473, PBSP SHU, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City, CA 95532

Our unity is our strength. If we learn to cultivate our unity, we can begin to reshape this world – back into a world that reflects our humanity – because there is too much pain and suffering in the world today that only our unity will end. We’ve got to be unapologetic and always be dedicated and serious about the revolutionary change we seek.

Violence only perpetuates more violence inside of the vortex of violence, the senseless taking of lives, like a timeless hour clock that never ends, feeding on the very lives of our families and friends.
An end to all hostilities means peace amongst the oppressed, where our children can focus on school and living their lives peacefully, while they develop into strong young men and women.

An end to all hostilities means peace for the elderly and worrisome minds, where they can take peaceful walks during any time of day or night, sit out on their porches and watch the moon and stars in the sky.
An end to all hostilities means peace where young men and women can go into any neighborhood to socialize with fellow human beings without fear of being attacked or murdered.
An end to all hostilities means peace where all races in the free society can coexist without worrying that their race or class will be a hazard to them.

During our strikes to end all hostilities – July 1 to July 20, 2011; Sept. 26 to Oct. 14, 2011; and July 8 to Sept. 4, 2013 – we men and women got together and said enough already!
An end to all hostilities is solidarity.

Send our brother some love and light: Mutope Duguma, s/n James Crawford, D-05996, PBSP SHU, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City, CA 95532.

Weighing sacrifices against successes, the price was too high, but the struggle moves forward

by Antonio Guillen
Greetings to one and all,
It has been three years since the commencement of the first hunger strike.
As I look back over that time to weigh our sacrifices against our successes, I have to admit that the accomplishments we’ve achieved thus far do allow me to be somewhat optimistic about the future. I cannot help, however, but remain angered at the cost of human life and damaged health we suffered simply to enact change – the price was way too high!
Hunger strike street altar feat. Christian Gomez at 40th & Clarke, Oakland by Molly Batchelder
The hunger strikes claimed at least two lives, both at Corcoran State Prison: Christian Gomez in 2011 and Billy Sell in 2013. These memorials were set up at a street festival in Oakland. – Photos: Molly Batchelder
Hunger strike street altar feat. Billy Sell at 40th & Clarke, Oakland by Molly Batchelder
And, although our accomplishments appear promising, in no way am I suggesting that we’ve succeeded in our overall struggle, which is to end long term solitary confinement and to better the living conditions of all SHU facilities – we are on our path, though!

As always, it’s of the upmost importance to acknowledge family and friends on the outside, who through your unwavering support have made it possible for us to be who we are today. Each of you, through your contributions and sacrifices, be they personal or collective, have helped pave the way for this struggle to move forward. And we on the inside will forever be grateful!
Power to the people.
Strength and respect,
Antonio Guillen

Send our brother some love and light: Antonio Guillen, P-81948, PBSP SHU, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City, CA 95532.

Work together to keep the pressure on

by Phil Fortman
July 8th is a date that made history around the world last year – 30,000 prisoners began a hunger strike in the state of California due to the inhumane conditions of solitary confinement.
The strike did not come about as a spur of the moment idea. No, these inhumane conditions have been worsening year after year, decade after decade until the outside and inside finally joined together in a movement for change.
This drawing, the icon for all three California hunger strikes recognized around the world, was contributed by the renowned prison artist Kevin “Rashid” Johnson, then held in solitary confinement in Virginia, now in Texas. – Art: Kevin “Rashid” Johnson, 1859887, Clements Unit, 9601 Spur 591, Amarillo TX 79107
This drawing, the icon for all three California hunger strikes recognized around the world, was contributed by the renowned prison artist Kevin “Rashid” Johnson, then held in solitary confinement in Virginia, now in Texas. – Art: Kevin “Rashid” Johnson, 1859887, Clements Unit, 9601 Spur 591, Amarillo TX 79107

The change started on July 1, 2011, and Sept. 26 of the same year, which set the course for the Big One – the one that got the attention of the world to show how prisoners are being treated, not only in California, but in most states of this country.

Speaking as one of the four main representatives for the prisoners in the Pelican Bay SHU, I applaud us all, prisoners and advocates alike, those who participated in the hunger strike and worked so hard for our case.
Looking back on this year, I see progress being made toward closing these holes – not as fast as we’d like, but the crack has been formed. The light is now beginning to seep in upon these dark, dreary walls for once.
In order to widen the crack until these walls come crashing down, we need to work together to keep the pressure on and on. We, as prisoners inside these places, have been advocating an end to hostilities among us. This attitude, along with the continued help and support of you good folks out there, will hopefully bring about a more civilized society and for us to live in peace and harmony.
I thank us all.

Send our brother some love and light: Phil Fortman, B-03557, PBSP SHU, P.O. Box 7500, Crescent City, CA 95532.

Women prisoners speak out on solitary and hunger strike anniversary

Solitary is torture. It humiliated me. They strip you of everything – I was only given a mumu and half a mattress. You are locked away with no answer. I was cold, tired and hungry. The other ladies in Ad Seg helped me out and also the ones on Death Row, which is right nearby, gave me stuff to survive.
The hunger strike last year was amazing. The guys went through hell, but it was so good for them to come together!
Send our sister some love and light: Alicia Zaragoza, X-07564, CCWF, P.O. Box 1508, Chowchilla, CA  93610.

Solitary confinement in all ways is cruel. If it is a form of abuse to keep a child locked away in a closet for long periods of time, then why is it not abuse to keep that same child, who is now a man, locked in a cell for years? Put yourself in their shoes! I supported the hunger strike.

Send our sister some love and light: Natalie De Mola, X-12907, CCWF, P.O. Box 1508, Chowchilla, CA 93610.

Saturday, June 14, 2014

Fight CA Prison Censorship - Submit your Commits Now! Sign the Petition!

Under the guise of “obscenity” regulations, the California Department of Corrections & Rehabilitation (CDCr) has proposed sweeping new political censorship rules for mail going both into and out of the prisons.

The proposed regulations are designed with two main purposes: 

1) To censor writings that educate the public about what is actually occurring inside the prisons, and 

2) To stifle the intellectual and political education and organizing of prisoners themselves for human rights-, political, educational and other positive goals.

Video
Please watch this VIDEO explaining more about how the regulations would work:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V_TOf5q9r_8


FACT SHEET                                LEGAL ANALYSIS

Stop Censorship Regs


“They want to be free to pursue the maintenance of the SHU torture units and the expansion of the prison industrial complex (and the ever-growing portion of the public’s tax dollars) without the prospect of legitimate criticism and the voice of opposition.”    
-Prisoner in Corcoran State Prison SHU

What you can do:

Write a short letter as comment, room prepared by CURB

or:

Write your own Email and send it to: rpmb@cdcr.ca.gov

The Supreme Court has already held as protected speech under the First Amendment prisoners' right to both criticize and protest prison conditions and regulations as these are clearly subjects of public interest. 

Please weigh in and speak out against these regulations. 


For more information about SHU torture in California, plz visit: 

Prisonerhungerstrikesolidarity.wordpress.com

Article by Mutope Duguma (incarcerated in PBSP-SHU): CDCr counterpunch: New rules designed to silence prison protest

Article by Mutope Duguma: New proposed censorship rules mean more torture for California prisoners in solitary 

Fact Sheet prepared by Prisoner Hunger Strike Solidarity (use this to copy for your letter).

Legal Analysis

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Humiliation and loss: Mass cell searches at Corcoran SHU

May 31, 2014
by Ajamu Watu (Terrance E. White)
In: SF Bay View

Revolutionary greetings!

As of this writing, I’m finally getting situated from another mass cell search being done here at the Corcoran SHU by Gestapo police. This is supposed to be a once a year ordeal, so they searched the whole yard. Well, if so, then why do we get searched so often at different, unexpected times and why do they use K9 dogs and the metal detectors on us and our mattresses?

This cell search had to be my most humiliating one yet, because we were escorted from our housing units in our boxers, T-shirts – or no T-shirt if you chose – and our shower shoes all the way to R&R visiting room to walk through the metal detectors after we were strip-searched at our cell doors before we came out. There was also female staff assisting with this so-called protocol, and I was told COs (correctional officers, or guards) even came from other yards to help out.

We had our mattresses scanned through the electronic metal detector but were not given any new bed linen when this ordeal was over. Of course our cells – our living quarters – were trashed so bad that it took a lot of us two days to get back somewhat comfortable.

The long walk in the hot sun around the whole yard and being locked in our stand-up yard cages all day with some cages not having running water and us not being able to bring our lunches with us caused medical problems for those who are up in age – 40-plus. I’ve just gotten over a two-day migraine from the ordeal.

I was informed – and found out it to be true – once I returned to my cell that the fascist oppressors were taking all extra clothing, any alleged appliances such as a TV that may be missing any parts to it, with no regard to you still being able to use it or if you have another one on the way. If you’re using two cable cord antennas or loose wires, they’re taking that too.

In some cases, you need more than one antenna to pick up the digital channel because it’s hard to do so in some cells due to the reception or your digital antenna’s cord is not long enough to reach your back wall where the reception is better. In my case, my ground antenna was snatched from the wall by these Gestapo fascist pigs with no regard as to why, when it was very unnecessary since my cable outlet was not missing the metal plate that covers it.

We haven’t been given our cell search slips yet, but I’ve already started my 602 appeal form that I will still be processing to note the unprofessional way my cell was handled in this search. When I had the section CO look at my cable outlet, he informed me it was broken off. I informed him my TV signal wasn’t working but my radio was.

He then told me to 602 it but made no attempt to retrieve another cable cord to hold me until the opportune time when I can purchase another one which is what it’s gonna boil down to because they’re not gonna replace it. When this happens – the cell searches lasted all week but I think they’re still not finished with a few more buildings – we get no program, no yard, showers, laundry or access to the law library, which they’ve cancelled unless you have a court date approaching, and in some cases you may still not be able to go.

The excuses are always the same: short on staff who really don’t feel like doing anything and since the S&Es do the medical escorts, it gives the building COs time to sit down on their lazy behinds and collect a paycheck. I’m sure you all will get more mail from inmates here at Corcoran with these stories of how this cell search affected these buildings. I’m positive some were handled worse than others depending on who was doing the search.

This to us is just another day living in the concrete tomb known as the Corcoran SHU graveyard. The struggle continues …

One love, one movement!

Ajamu Wadu, a servant of the oppressed people

Send our brother some love and light: Terrance E. White, AG-8738, Cor SHU 4B-1R-26L, P.O. Box 3481, Corcoran CA 93212.

Solidarity with our Sister Site:

Solidarity with our Sister Site:
Nevada Prison Watch

Nevada Prison Watch

Read it!

ACLU report on the LA County Jail

ACLU report on the LA County Jail
"Cruel and Usual Punishment: How a Savage Gang of Deputies Controls LA County Jails"

Buried Alive: Long-term Isolation in California's Youth and Adult Prisons

Buried Alive: Long-term Isolation in California's Youth and Adult Prisons
AFSC Report May 2011 (click on picture)